Vernese Hilton Firefighter
Vernese Hilton Firefighter

“At first it was a bit like being under a microscope. But then they know you work, you do your share. They’ve gotten used to me like I’ve gotten used to them.”

Carol McKechnie Airline Mechanic
Carol McKechnie Airline Mechanic

“Some of the guys worried that they were going to have to open the door for me. I put them at ease. I don’t ask them to do my job for me. I help everybody. My main goal is just to get the plane out on time, whether there are thirty of us of just one.”

Barbara Moore Bricklayer
Barbara Moore Bricklayer

“I believe women are equal to men. I’m not sure these guys believe that. But instead of getting into a debate with them about our different world views, I have survived by trying to concentrate on what we have in common and improving our working conditions. I also survived by working with the union, because the Union Apprenticeship Program guaranteed that I had the same training and education as men.”

Becky Smith Highway Engineer
Becky Smith Highway Engineer

“I was waiting for my knight in shining armor to marry me, but he never showed up. So I had to take care of myself.”

Becky Tressler Locomotive Passenger Engineer
Becky Tressler Locomotive Passenger Engineer

“A lot of guys drop the macho image once we’re in the engine working together. They realize that we can get the job done without false pretenses. This makes the work environment much easier and enjoyable.”

Jean Tyler Shipfitter
Jean Tyler Shipfitter

“I don’t like to lose my femininity. When I’m working I always wear a fragrance, so when the men go by, they know the difference.”

Savannah Cunningham Longshoreman
Savannah Cunningham Longshoreman

“I’ve been working on the docks for almost twenty years. They tried to get rid of me in the beginning by saying there was no work. But I saw they gave work to the guy behind me in line so I kept coming back. We did heavy lifting and hard work back then that the young guys won’t even do today.”

Sharon Eder Carpenter
Sharon Eder Carpenter

“There were always men giving me a hard time, harassing me. Then I’d be on a job about two weeks and they’d say, ‘she can do it!’”

Joann Giesey Terminal Control Specialist
Joann Giesey Terminal Control Specialist

“People feel that working on the waterfront is a man’s job. The hardest thing in this job for a woman is to be able to handle the way men talk to you, men who are not used to working with a woman. They sometimes look at you funny.”

Vernese Hilton Firefighter
Carol McKechnie Airline Mechanic
Barbara Moore Bricklayer
Becky Smith Highway Engineer
Becky Tressler Locomotive Passenger Engineer
Jean Tyler Shipfitter
Savannah Cunningham Longshoreman
Sharon Eder Carpenter
Joann Giesey Terminal Control Specialist
Vernese Hilton Firefighter

“At first it was a bit like being under a microscope. But then they know you work, you do your share. They’ve gotten used to me like I’ve gotten used to them.”

Carol McKechnie Airline Mechanic

“Some of the guys worried that they were going to have to open the door for me. I put them at ease. I don’t ask them to do my job for me. I help everybody. My main goal is just to get the plane out on time, whether there are thirty of us of just one.”

Barbara Moore Bricklayer

“I believe women are equal to men. I’m not sure these guys believe that. But instead of getting into a debate with them about our different world views, I have survived by trying to concentrate on what we have in common and improving our working conditions. I also survived by working with the union, because the Union Apprenticeship Program guaranteed that I had the same training and education as men.”

Becky Smith Highway Engineer

“I was waiting for my knight in shining armor to marry me, but he never showed up. So I had to take care of myself.”

Becky Tressler Locomotive Passenger Engineer

“A lot of guys drop the macho image once we’re in the engine working together. They realize that we can get the job done without false pretenses. This makes the work environment much easier and enjoyable.”

Jean Tyler Shipfitter

“I don’t like to lose my femininity. When I’m working I always wear a fragrance, so when the men go by, they know the difference.”

Savannah Cunningham Longshoreman

“I’ve been working on the docks for almost twenty years. They tried to get rid of me in the beginning by saying there was no work. But I saw they gave work to the guy behind me in line so I kept coming back. We did heavy lifting and hard work back then that the young guys won’t even do today.”

Sharon Eder Carpenter

“There were always men giving me a hard time, harassing me. Then I’d be on a job about two weeks and they’d say, ‘she can do it!’”

Joann Giesey Terminal Control Specialist

“People feel that working on the waterfront is a man’s job. The hardest thing in this job for a woman is to be able to handle the way men talk to you, men who are not used to working with a woman. They sometimes look at you funny.”

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